Kew Gardens

Kew Gardens

Happy Easter! To celebrate the start of spring, I went to London’s Kew Gardens!

The 330+ acre botanical garden is a must, especially when we’re still in some sort of lockdown.

We arrived before 1pm and hadn’t completed it, even by 5pm – to give you an idea of how huge the gardens are…

Kew Gardens was very socially distanced, there was enough space for everyone to be spaced out without worry.

Arriving at Kew Gardens

Upon arriving, we were greeted with a magnificent display of Cherry Blossom trees and the beginning of a Beano (Dennis the Menace-themed) Easter Hunt for kids.

Cherry Blossom Tree (and Beano’s Dennis the Menace-themed Hunt starting point)

Trees at Kew Gardens

In terms of our favourite trees, we loved the Japanese Cherry Blossom (a spring-time fave), the African Baobab and Redwood, as well as a variation of sweet chestnut trees.

Kew Gardens
Sweet Chestnut
Kew Gardens
Redwood

The Baobab trees, which I wish I’d taken a photo of (my phone was low battery, so I had to turn it off), looked like something out of The Lion King from afar, but up close, were tall enough ( when looking up) to make you dizzy.

Indoor excursions at Kew Gardens

We followed the trail along and came across a barn, some greenhouses, stately homes, a lake – and my favourite of all: a thatched cottage (pictured). All indoor enclosures were closed, obviously. But, there was still plenty to see & do outdoors.

Kew Gardens
My favourite thatched cottage

One thing we were looking forward to was the Badger Set (which I also couldn’t take a photo of). Unfortunately, that was also closed due to Covid. What I didn’t realise was that humans are able to crawl through the Badger Set when it’s open!

I found the whole idea of being inside a Badger Set unnerving as that’s pretty much like trespassing a badger’s property… What if a baby badger was squashed by accident?

Personally, I’d much rather see them burrowing and running around happily around their enclosure, as opposed to stepping into it.

Kew Gardens
Japanese Garden

Japanese Garden

Another highlight of ours was visiting the Japanese Garden (pictured above) and Pagoda (below). In normal, non-Covid circumstances, you could climb up the tower – making you way all the way to the top for the views. But, that, like everything else which involved being indoors, was closed.

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Pagoda
Kew Gardens
Tulip display

Flowers at Kew Gardens


In terms of flowers, we were thoroughly impressed with the tulip display (pictured above), the magnolias and the Japanese Camellia.

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Japanese Camellia
Kew Gardens
Pink Magnolia
Kew Gardens
White Magnolia
Kew Gardens

Animals at Kew Gardens

Of all the animals we came across, the peacock stole the show. Everyone who came into contact with it was following them around as if they were some kind of celebrity (myself included)!

Kew Gardens
Kew Gardens
Kew Gardens
Kew Gardens
Kew Gardens
Kew Gardens

Other things to do at Kew Gardens

We had a picnic and enjoyed the sun (which came out at brief intervals). Overall, even though it was a grey day, didn’t rain, and wasn’t muddy. You can’t say great without ‘grey’. To conclude, it was an absolute blast of a day!

We’re planning to go there again to complete it, and hopefully check out the indoor parts post-Covid.

Before you go, check out my photo dump (below), featuring all of my favourite shots! Feel free to read my previous post here.

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Kew Gardens
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Kew Gardens
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Kew Gardens

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A blogger, freelance journalist & marketing officer. I’ve had articles published in T3.com and Archant plc. I’ve interned at Closer Magazine and Huffington Post. Instagram 📸: @miamii.mansour Twitter 🐥: @ExploreWithMii

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